Most Anticipated Non-Fiction Books for 2024 - Part 1

Ah, the excitement of a new year, particularly for us bibliophiles! While fiction can transport us to fantastical worlds, non-fiction offers a treasure trove of real-life experiences, perspectives, and knowledge. And 2024 promises to be an exceptional year for those seeking non-fiction thrills.

So, settle in, grab your favorite reading beverage, and let's embark on a journey through the most anticipated non-fiction books of 2024. From personal memoirs that crack open hearts to mind-bending investigations that challenge our understanding of the world, get ready to be enthralled, informed, and inspired.

January 2024

The Girl Who Touched The Stars by Bonnie Hancock

A memoir - Published by Harper Collins

254 days, 12,700 kilometres, sea sickness, sharks, crocodiles and ocean. Bonnie Hancock broke numerous records on her fastest ever circumnavigation by paddle around Australia but that wasn't the achievement she is most proud of. Testing the limits of her mental and physical toughness, she learned what it means to overcome adversity and how important teamwork and perspective truly are. What looks distressing from the rocky shore or storm-tossed waves can be inspiring when you look to the heavens.

The Girl Who Touched the Stars is a love story, a travelogue and an exhilarating exploration of human ambition coming face to face with the beauty and power of nature. But most of all it's a lesson in overcoming self-doubt, trusting others and finding your true self. Bonnie demonstrates vividly and honestly the resilience of the human spirit and the importance of reaching for the stars.

The Girl who touched the stars

February 2024

Supercommunicators by Charles Duhigg

Self-help and Personal development - Published by Random House Business

How is it that we find it easy to talk to some people and struggle to do so with others? Why does the effectiveness of a message rely so strongly on who the messenger is? And what is the secret of having a successful difficult conversation?

Charles Duhigg has the answer to all these questions and many more, and in Everything is a Conversation he shares the arts and science of successful communication. He explains the neuroscience of listening. He interviews expert persuaders and reveals their secrets. And he reveals the techniques we can all master to achieve a sense of true connectedness with others, however tricky the circumstances. Along the way he shows how a board game fanatic used his conversational skills to become a champion, how a potentially fatal outbreak of botulism was prevented not by medical diagnosis but by talking, and what Plato has to teach us about empathy. Packed with fascinating stories and drawing on cutting-edge research, this is a wonderfully readable and rewarding book on an essential human skill.

Supercommunicators

March 2024

The Menopause Brain by Lisa Mosconi PhD

Women's Health - Published by Allen & Unwin

Menopause and perimenopause are still a black box to most doctors, leaving patients exasperated as they grapple with symptoms ranging from hot flushes to insomnia and brain fog. As a leading neuroscientist and women's brain health specialist, Dr Lisa Mosconi unravels the mystery by revealing how menopause doesn't impact just the ovaries, but is a hormonal show in which the brain takes centre stage.

The decline of oestrogen during menopause influences everything from body temperature to mood and memory, potentially paving the way for cognitive decline later in life. To conquer these challenges successfully, Mosconi brings us the latest approaches: from cutting-edge hormone replacement therapies such as 'designer oestrogens' to the role of hormonal contraception, and key lifestyle changes encompassing diet, exercise, self-care, and self-talk.
Best of all, Mosconi dispels the myth that menopause signifies an end, demonstrating it's actually a transition. Contrary to popular belief, if we know how to take care of ourselves during menopause, we can emerge with a renewed, enhanced brain—and usher in a meaningful and vibrant new chapter of life.
The Menopause brain

April 2024

Why We Remember by Dr Charan Ranganath

Science - Published by Faber
A radical reexamination of memory by pioneering neuroscientist and internationally-renowned memory researcher, Charan Ranganath. We talk about memory as a record of the past, but here's a surprising twist: we aren't supposed toremember everything. In fact, we're designed to forget. Over the course of twenty-five years, CharanRanganath has studied the flawed, incomplete and purposefully inaccurate nature of memory to findthat our brains haven't evolved to keep a comprehensive record of events, but to extract theinformation needed to guide our futures.Using fascinating case studies and testimonies, Why We Remember unveils the principles behind whatand why we forget and shines new light on the silent, pervasive influence of memory on how welearn, heal and make decisions. By examining the role that attention, intention, imagination andemotion play in the storing of memories, it provides a vital user's guide to remembering what we holdmost dear
Why We Remember

Knife by Salman Rushdie

A Memoir - Published by Jonathan Cape

On the morning of 12 August 2022, Salman Rushdie was standing onstage at the Chautauqua Institution in upstate New York, preparing to give a lecture on the importance of keeping writers safe from harm, when a man in black – black clothes, black mask – rushed down the aisle towards him, wielding a knife. His first thought: So it’s you. Here you are.

What followed was a horrific act of violence that shook the literary world and beyond. Now, for the first time, and in unforgettable detail, Rushdie relives the traumatic events of that day and its aftermath, as well as his journey towards physical recovery and the healing that was made possible by the love and support of his wife, Eliza, his family, his army of doctors and physical therapists, and his community of readers worldwide.

Knife by Salman Rushdie

May 2024

FIlterworld by Kyle Chayka

Ethical Issues - Published by Bonnier

From one of the New Yorker's most exciting young writers: a brilliant breakdown of how algorithms have shaped our physical and artistic worlds.

The early promise of a free Internet is long gone. Now, rather than allowing us a meaningful relationship with a range of content of our choosing, algorithms have not only removed genuine choice but de-texturized the world around us: smoothed its edges, planed down friction, and flattened differences. So coffee shops from Brooklyn to Beijing are inflected with a similar, 'Instagrammable' aesthetic. Airbnb rentals are decked out for their swipability factor as much as for their comfort. Spotify builds playlists that echo a category, looping back to music we've already heard before so as not to disrupt the flow. Netflix doesn't just make suggestions based on viewing histories but it actively changes the thumbnails to increase the chances we click on it.
Filterworld
Remember, these are just a taste of the incredible books waiting to be discovered in 2024.
Still unsure where to begin? Don't worry! That's where Booxies comes in. We're passionate about connecting readers with books they'll truly cherish. Whether you're drawn to a specific genre or crave expert recommendations, our curated boxes take the guesswork out of finding your next non-fiction adventure.
Booxies is the perfect gift for yourself or a loved one, sparking hours of intellectual engagement and personal growth. 

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